Knights show off working class rootsPhotos

Knights show off working class roots | Photos SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll
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SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

SEA OF ORANGE: All the action from the Newcastle Knights’ 18-16 triumph against Wests Tigers on Sunday at Hunter Stadium. Knights players and fans wore high-vis for Voice for Mining family day. Pictures: Jonathan Carroll

TweetFacebookWoohoo we got a win!!! #up the mighty Knights!!! So proud of our boys well done!!!#NRLKnightsTigers#GoKnightspic.twitter南京夜网/mvtxn0387c

— Jessica Marvig (@Jesseika25) April 10, 2016Footy with the boys #VoiceforMining#[email protected]南京夜网/GG68LguwaM

— Kristy George (@George87K) April 10, 2016

Pressure on Turnbull over banks as three more Nats MPs speak out on royal commission

Pressure is mounting on Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to hold an inquiry into the banking and finance sector. Photo: Craig Sillitoe Malcolm Turnbull says the budget will include tax changesdesigned to generate jobs and growth; and promote investment, innovation and enterprise. Photo: Andrew Meares
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Three more Nationals MPs, including a dumped former minister, have left the door open to supporting a royal commission into the banking and finance sector, ramping up pressure on Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to hold the inquiry and highlighting divisions in the Coalition over the issue.

And Australian Council of Trade Union chief Dave Oliver has also thrown his weight behind the move, writing to Mr Turnbull on Sunday to urge the inquiry – and to create a federal independent commission against corruption – because of the “many scandals and allegations of corrupt behaviour in recent times”.

The Coalition and Labor are on a collision course for an election year fight over wrong-doing in unions and the finance sector after Mr Shorten announced on Friday that if elected, the ALP would hold a two-year, $53 million inquiry after a string of allegations of wrong doing at Westpac, ANZ, the Commonwealth Bank and elsewhere in recent years.

On Sunday, cabinet ministers Peter Dutton and Josh Frydenberg as well as Mr Turnbull pushed back against the inquiry, with the prime minister describing it as a “thought bubble” and arguing banks and financial services were already heavily regulated.

“[ASIC] has all of the powers to inquire of a royal commission but it’s got the powers to prosecute and to take action, which it is doing. It has many current actions on the books at the moment. It has banned people from in the industry, it has enacted fines, it is a very active regulator,” he said.

“In addition to that you have the prudential regulation authority, APRA, and it also has powers equal to a royal commission and indeed greater.”

The opposition leader, Mr Turnbull said, was trying to distract people from the fact that Labor opposes the restoration of the construction industry watch, the ABCC.

But Nationals MP George Christensen backed the probe, while MPs Luke Hartsuyker and Ken O’Dowd indicated they could be prepared to support it too, creating a political headache for the prime minister.

Mr Hartsuyker, a former minister for vocational education in the Abbott government, said of the inquiry: “I think it is definitely something that should be considered”.

He is the most senior government MP yet to indicate a willingness to support the probe.

Mr O’Dowd said he was “open to the idea, but I need more evidence and I wouldn’t like to see the reputation of the big four banks tarnished overseas”.

Mr Christensen went further, declaring ” NormalfalsefalseEN-AUJAX-NONE /* Style Definitions */table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:””; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Prison managers’ failure to share information led to brutal jail attack: union

Steve McMahon, chairman of the Prison Officer’s branch of the Public Services Union Photo: Channel Seven
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IS supporter carves ‘e4e’ on ex-Digger’s head in NSW prison

The “complete failure” of prison managers to share critical information with the rest of the staff is to blame for a brutal attack allegedly carried out by an Islamic State supporter on his cell mate, the prison officers’ union says.

The 18-year-old Islamic State supporter allegedly used a sharp tool to carve the letters “e4e” into the forehead of a fellow inmate imprisoned at the Mid-North Coast Correctional Centre in Kempsey within hours of the pair being locked in a cell together on Thursday.

The letters were an apparent reference to the terrorist group’s “eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth” mantra.

The general manager of the correctional centre has been suspended pending the outcome of an internal investigation, NSW Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin told reporters in Sydney on Sunday.

The 40-year-old victim, who reportedly served in East Timor, is “close to being released back to a correctional centre”, the Department of Corrective Services said.

The teenager had a maximum security classification and the former soldier had a minimum security classification.

Steve McMahon, chairman of the Prison Officer’s branch of the Public Services Union, said the two should never have been placed in a cell together.

However, he alleges that managers failed to pass on vital information about the radicalised prisoner that “would have prevented” the vicious attack.

“We believe there was sufficient information that, if acted on correctly, would have prevented this from happening,” Mr McMahon said.

“It was a complete failure by the people in positions of responsibility, who had access to that information, to share it with the people who needed it to do their job.”

He said prison officers made decisions about which inmates to place together “every day”, based on the evidence provided to them.

However, in this case, “the evidence that said that they shouldn’t have been together was mismanaged or withheld for some unknown reason”.

“It was a bad choice of cells based on incorrect information,” Mr McMahon said.

He added that prison officers had been particularly distressed by Thursday’s unprovoked attack, in which the teenager allegedly carved letters into the front and back of the older inmate’s head and crushed his sternum before placing a towel over his head and pouring boiling hot water over it.

“It’s quite a horrendous piece of work, not unlike torture,” he said.

Inappropriate or careless cell placement has contributed to more than 20 deaths in NSW prison custody in the 10 years to 2011, according to coronial reports.

And failure to communicate vital information about prisoners’ health and safety has been implicated in more than a dozen deaths-in-custody cases, including at least three homicides.

Mr McMahon said such incidents were “rare” but they demonstrated why it was “critical that managers, when they receive information, deal with it correctly”.

He said the Public Services Association believed the teenager had previously demonstrated “radical Muslim views” but the department had failed to act on it.

“The last year they’ve been denying there’s any problem with radicalised Muslims or any other radicalised individual in jail,” he said.

“We’ve been calling on them to produce a policy on such and allocate some programs and resources for it.”

He said the daily interaction between prison staff and inmates meant Corrective Services officers were in a unique position to help address the rise of religious fundamentalism in jails.

“[But] at the moment we don’t believe that we’re being adequately equipped to deal with this new threat.”

The Department of Corrective Services told Fairfax Media it would seek “an independent assessment of its policies and procedures for the placement of fundamentalist inmates” following the attack.

“CSNSW has seen a gradual increase in the number of fundamentalist inmates in recent years and, while that number remains small, ongoing efforts are placed on dealing with any possible violent extremism,” a spokesperson said.

“Its officers are trained and ready to deal with the changing and increasingly volatile mix of inmates in the state’s prisons.”

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Rio 2016 Olympics: Dawn Fraser says Australian swimmers can rival icons of Melbourne in 1956

Dawn Fraser has tuned in to the good vibrations slowly building around the Olympic trials pool in Adelaide, saying Australia’s contingent at Rio could be as good – and perhaps surpass – the legendary team that slayed its rivals at Melbourne’s 1956 Games.
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The swimming great, who spent seven years training in Adelaide under coach Harry Gallagher, has arrived at the Australian Championships and quickly been impressed by what she has seen in and out of the pool.

The sport hasn’t gripped the public’s imagination since a poor showing at the London Games and doesn’t have the household star-power of previous generations, where Ian Thorpe, Susie O’Neill and Fraser had serious cut-through with sports fans.

Yet the embers are glowing very bright on the back of a high-quality showing at last year’s FINA World Championships in Russia. At the trials in Adelaide, the leading lights have given the impression they can do some serious damage in Rio as well.

Melbourne remains Australia’s greatest Games in the pool, with Australia winning eight golds, four silver and two bronze to finish well ahead of runners-up, the United States.

Gone are the days when it is Australia v America yet Fraser can see greatness in the team being compiled for Brazil.

“I’ve never predicted gold medals for any Olympic team. I’m always asked and I’ve refused to say that. But I think this team is going to be nearly as good – if not better – than the 1956 team,” Fraser said.

“Because they’ve got more events, they’re a lot more scientific in their make-up. I wish we could have had that. Everyone is learning and they’re doing good times. It’s very exciting.”

The rebuild on the heels of London has been swift, aggressive and now on the verge of paying handsome dividends.

A team that was divided in London fell accordingly, failing to win any individual gold medals at all and hanging its hat on the brilliance of the womens 4 x 100 metre freestyle relay.

Fraser has enjoyed a renewed camaraderie when mingling with the swimmers, as well as the rise of influential female leaders within the group such as Brisbane sprint sisters Bronte and Cate Campbell.

“I’m seeing some strength in the water and I’m seeing a team that is a team. They’re competitive in the water but a team out of the water. And that says a lot for Australian swimming and what they’ve done. They’ve turned it around since London in 2012,” Fraser said.

“When they get out of the water they shake hands with each other, give each other a bit of a cuddle and say ‘well done’. We haven’t seen that for a number of years. I think Rio is going to be fantastic.

“It reminds me of the 1956 team. We were all very compatible. We were competitors in the pool but we were very good mates. We went one-two-three in both men and women’s 100m and I just think we could do that again.”

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Owners turn down multimillion-dollar offer for fairytale filly Yankee Rose

Champagne racing: Jockey Zac Purton rides Yankee Rose to win the Sires’ Produce Stakes. Photo: bradleyphotos南京夜网419论坛The Yankee Rose fairytale is set to continue in Saturday’s Champagne Stakes at Randwick after her owners turned down a multimillion-dollar offer for the group 1-winning filly.
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Darby Racing put together the syndicate of mostly first-time owners in the All American filly, which cost $10,000 at the yearling sales, and has been fielding offers since before her second placing in the Golden Slipper. However, after her success in the Sires’ Produce Stakes, a major breeder significantly raised the stakes with an offer believed to be more than $2 million.

“We have had a couple of offers but the last one was the most serious, so we sat everyone down and had a vote,” syndicator Scott Darby said.

“The owners want to keep racing her and they know she is going to be worth $1 million or more when she finishes, so they wanted to keep enjoying this ride.

“I have been in this game for a while and you have to pinch yourself when a filly like her comes along. It is a new experience for all of us, even me, and it is only just beginning and we don’t where it could finish. This is the dream when you buy horse. You never think it is going to happen. It has changed a few of these owners’ lives.”

The ownership group has also voted to keep the filly with trainer David Vandyke, who has masterminded her four-race career for three wins. Yankee Rose has returned more than $1.3 million and another $300,000 will be added if she wins on Saturday.

“They just want everything to stay the same and [for] her to keep winning,” Darby said with regard to Vandyke continuing as her trainer, even when he moves to Queensland.

“She has paid for a lot of things. There has been a deposit on a farm, some house extensions and, my favourite, a Harley Davidson bought because of her and we are looking forward to getting to the races again on Saturday.”

Yankee Rose was only a half-length from creating history when she beat all but Capitalist in the Golden Slipper when first-up from a spell. She followed that by dominating in the Sires’ Produce Stakes at Randwick on the first day of The Championships.

She will start as favourite in the Champagne Stakes, where Jason Collett will take over in the saddle from Zac Purton, who is unavailable. Collett rode the filly to her two wins last year but rode  Honesty Prevails in the Golden Slipper.

“It is just good to get back on her when the chance came,” he said. “You always look at her and think what if, so I want to make the most of Saturday. You have seen what she did in the Slipper and winning the Sires and she looks like the mile on Saturday is going to be perfect for her.”

Vandyke has been impressed with the way Yankee Rose has coped with the two-year-old triple crown after he decided to take on the Golden Slipper. The only worry he has had is that she sprang a plate on Saturday but suffered no ill effects from it.

“I thought it was the right thing to do, going into the Slipper first up, but you are always second-guessing yourself,” Vandyke said. “I thought she might be a bit flat in the Sires but she came out with a career-best performance.

“She defies logic this filly, she keeps improving. We had that problem with the shoe but she was quite happy once we got the farrier to her.”

Vandyke has decided to take the blinkers off Yankee Rose for the Champagne, despite her wearing them at her two group 1 runs.

“She just got over-racing a bit in the Sires and I think she will relax better without them and that will help her at the mile,” he said. “They sharpened her up for the Slipper but she won well without them at her first two starts, so I don’t think she needs them.”

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